{ 21 comments }

Caroline Hines October 30, 2009 at 3:20 pm

Why Do They Leave Forrester? | The Relationship Economy…… http://tinyurl.com/ybr2x4n

vinnie mirchandani August 25, 2009 at 8:43 am

you did not mention Ray wang who just left Forrester. In recent conversations with Ray, he went through a similar thought process like I did 10 years ago while at Gartner. Our comp was less than 10% of revenues we could show a role in generating or delivering. Differently from Wall Street, because the analyst firms have direct sales forces, that is where much of the comp gets directed. So, as in so much of tech very little actually goes into “product” and much more towards SG&A – which helps neither buyer nor investor. Large gross margins which could be passed along in lower pricing to buyers or in higher investor returns get pissed away.

Suzan Gray August 24, 2009 at 4:21 pm

Why Do They Leave Forrester? http://short.to/nuc5 e.g. like @jowyang @charleneli

Carter Lusher August 24, 2009 at 4:02 pm

Hi,

Good post about the relationship aspect. However there are a few points I want to disagree with.

I agree with David Dalka that superstars leaving firms is not a new trend brought on by social media. From the early 80’s on superstars have left Gartner, Yankee, IDC, etc to form firms that became prominent in their own right (e.g., Forrester itself was launched by a Yankee Group superstar) or successful single practitionerships. While social media can make it easier for an individual to develop a person brand, there is no guarantee that they will be successful in launching a business based on that brand.
To a certain extent, maybe the firms do not want to retain superstars. There is no discussion in your post about the economics of employee retention – superstar, star or good old solid analysts – for analyst firms, especially public companies like Forrester and Gartner. There is always the tradeoff between revenue growths vs. margins erosion when those firms think about making an offer to retain talent. You can see more detail in…

http://sagecircle.wordpress.com/2009/08/24/large-advisory-analyst-firms-and-superstar-analysts/

Your comparison between Jeremiah’s blog and Forrester.com (which I also did a month ago for a different reason see http://sagecircle.wordpress.com/2009/07/31/dont-underestimate-the-analyst-visibility/) is not an apples-to-apples comparison. Web Strategy by Jeremiah, which he has brilliantly promoted, is an open forum for anybody to read. Forrester.com is a corporate website that only has promotional content freely available while the “good stuff” (e.g., research notes) is available only to clients with a password. As a consequence, there is a logical ceiling for unique visitors to Forrester.com whereas a blog has no limit to the number of visitors.

The other point I want to make is that this is focused only on the social media aspect. If firms like Gartner or Forrester only sold written research they would be toast. What they really sell is convenient access to analysts for personal advice. For example, the largest advisory firms conduct over 350,000 phone-based inquiries and 150,000 formal 1-on-1s at their conferences every year. See…

http://sagecircle.wordpress.com/2009/08/06/dont-discount-business-value-of-phone-based-inquiries/

I am a huge proponent of social media and work with many clients to help them incorporate social media into their AR plans. However, social media is only one facet of the complex web of interactions within the analyst ecosystem.

Cheers, -carter j

Carter Lusher, Strategist
SageCircle, “analysts of the analysts” and analyst relations best practices
http://www.sagecircle.wordpress.com

Business 3.0 Tech. August 24, 2009 at 2:08 pm

Why Do They Leave Forrester? http://tinyurl.com/ncdxr8 Forrester seems to have a problem retaining its top talent. Among some of the high..

Alan See August 24, 2009 at 10:46 am

http://bit.ly/t2xZk There is a new organizational risk arising as a result of social media … via @JDeragon … thought provoking

Brian C. Citizen August 24, 2009 at 9:43 am

Daily Deragon Dose: Why Do They Leave Forrester? http://bit.ly/pAlNY

BrianCitizen (Brian C. Citizen) August 24, 2009 at 9:47 am

Twitter Comment


Daily Deragon Dose: Why Do They Leave Forrester? [link to post]

Posted using Chat Catcher

David Dalka August 24, 2009 at 9:38 am

Sorry to bust up the party, but this is NOT a new issue.

Study mutual funds in the late 80’s and early 90’s (Peter Lynch, etc.). The firms that embraced the superstar model became household names. There are several mutual funds that had better track records but not the stories surrounding the people. I think Fidelity did OK if my memory serves me right. 🙂

Angela Suddarth August 24, 2009 at 8:12 am

[email protected] Why Do They Leave Forrester?: Maybe Forrester should consider doing a study that provides.. http://bit.ly/1GcO4c

Martin August 24, 2009 at 7:18 am

[email protected] Why Do They Leave Forrester?: Maybe Forrester should consider doing a study that provides.. http://bit.ly/1GcO4c

Stephen Kincaid August 24, 2009 at 7:00 am

Reviewing: Why Do They Leave Forrester?: Maybe Forrester should consider doing a study that provides r.. http://tinyurl.com/mushc6

Avi Joseph August 24, 2009 at 6:44 am

Why Do They Leave Forrester? http://bit.ly/17qK7H #fb

smconnection August 24, 2009 at 6:38 am

Why Do They Leave Forrester?: Maybe Forrester should consider doing a study that provides recommended solutions .. http://bit.ly/pAlNY

stephenckincaid (Stephen Kincaid) August 24, 2009 at 7:03 am

Twitter Comment


Reviewing: Why Do They Leave Forrester?: Maybe Forrester should consider doing a study that provides r.. [link to post]

Posted using Chat Catcher

Achievers Network August 24, 2009 at 5:50 am

Why Do They Leave Forrester?: Maybe Forrester should consider doing a study that provides recommended solutions .. http://bit.ly/pAlNY

JDeragon (JDeragon) August 24, 2009 at 6:27 am

Twitter Comment


Why Do They Leave Forrester? [link to post]

Posted using Chat Catcher

David Meerman Scott August 24, 2009 at 5:58 am

It’s always interesting to see when stars emerge out of existing brands. Scoble out of Microsoft for example. How much is the individual? And how much of the fame is the company they work for?

I see this a lot with Wall Street firms. If you are a trader at Solomon Brothers or Morgan Stanley and you’re trading a billion dollars of your firm’s capital based on your firm’s reputation in the market, are you worth ten million a year in compensation?

Lots Gartner and Forrester analysts have reached celebrity status and then left. But many of them find it is tough going when they do not have the famous firm behind them. Same is true of traders. Can you make ten million a year as a trader on your own? Can you still book keynote speaking gigs with “former” in front of the analyst firm name in your bio?

AlanSee (Alan See) August 24, 2009 at 5:49 am

Twitter Comment


[link to post] There is a new organizational risk arising as a result of social media … via @JDeragon … thought provoking

Posted using Chat Catcher

prblogs (prblogs) August 24, 2009 at 5:47 am

Twitter Comment


RelationshipEcon: Why Do They Leave Forrester?: Maybe Forrester should consider doing a study t.. [link to post]

Posted using Chat Catcher

JDeragon (JDeragon) August 24, 2009 at 5:40 am

Twitter Comment


Why Do They Leave Forrester?: Maybe Forrester should consider doing a study that provides recommended solutions .. [link to post]

Posted using Chat Catcher

Comments on this entry are closed.

{ 3 trackbacks }

Previous post:

Next post: